Science: A Playground for the Perpetual Child

Yesterday I read a hardcore Genetics textbook. As I thumbed the pages, simultaneously struggling to appreciate the concepts behind the words and reveling in the wonder of our being, I was struck by the fact that I love to learn. Both friends and self would have flagellated me had I stated that fact (or even felt it) as a young man or child.  Studying and learning were fancies of the nerds. Now I reflect on childhood, mine as well as that of our children. I recall mostly the experiences of our three infants and toddlers. They perpetually tested their environment. The distance of a jump, height of a tree climb, method of a toss, or speed of a swing: Everything was under scrutiny because everything was to be improved. They’d try different methods to accomplish their latest feat and after failure upon failure they’d find a way to succeed. Sometimes they’d later revise their techniques, using the wisdom of age and experience as their guide. In essence they were continuously studying and experimenting on themselves and their environs. They not only loved to study; they lived to study.

Today I find myself in a similar place. No longer able to accomplish past physical achievements, I am relegated to handsprings of the mind. I think and learn voraciously. What I learn, I teach. Though I miss the physical challenges and conquests of youth, this phase of life has plenty to offer. Often I communicate with similarly minded colleagues to discuss the latest and greatest ideas and discoveries. What fascinates us most though, and lures us in more than anything else, is our perpetual amazement by the bottomless well of knowledge from which we draw. It is not intimidating; it is invigorating. Our understanding takes us back in time, to the adventures of childhood. Science is an endless quest for very old children; a fearsome ride one never wants to leave. The adage, “the more you know, the more you realize how much you don’t know” is not only true, it’s tantalizing. It embodies the glory that keeps us steadfast in the game while we are fortunate enough to remain above ground.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information more about essential vitamins and supplements visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

Comments { 0 }

Save the Date: It’s the American Society for Preventive Cardiology’s 40th Anniversary – The July 2015 Conference is Shaping up to be Extraordinary

That’s a long title for this week’s blog, but it’s tough to shorten. Planning a conference is quite a challenge: The venue is chosen; topics are selected; speakers are invited; and the word is disseminated. Many people’s hands are in the mix – in the case of the ASPC, our management company as well as members of the planning and executive committees work tirelessly to create a conference that will meet and exceed its intent. This year’s ASPC meetings, again at the beautiful Boca Raton Resort, will bring together attendees from across the country (and likely outside the US as well) in order to learn from some of our nation’s most renowned experts in genetics, vascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, women’s heart health, inflammation, thrombosis, CVD risk reduction strategies, familial hypercholesterolemia, lipids and lipoproteins, novel medications…

Our goal is to highlight the most cutting edge as well as tried and true approaches for ASCVD prevention so clinicians eager to improve their strategies to combat and prevent the toll of vascular disease among their patients can more effectively do so. Conference attendees are among the most dedicated of our country’s healthcare practitioners – cardiologists, internists, obstetricians, family practitioners, nurse practitioners, physicians’ assistants, pharmacists, dietitians, and many others. The Boca Raton Regional Hospital supports the program and offers its physicians the opportunity to attend this one-of-a-kind meeting. Groups such as WomenHeart, and chapters of the ACC and AHA (and others) typically endorse the meetings as well. This year, in honor of the ASPC’s 40th Anniversary, the meetings will offer its attendees two new opportunities. First, abstracts from trainees across the globe will be evaluated for presentation. Second, we will offer the inaugural Expert’s Course in ASCVD Prevention. Diplomas will be awarded to those who successfully complete the course. So who are our speakers – professors and experts in their disciplines from Harvard, Hopkins, Emory, The Mayo, Columbia, UCSD, Tulane, Minnesota, NYU, and other outstanding institutions. And when is the meeting – July 31 through August 2nd. Put it on your calendar – you and your patients will be very happy you did. See you in July!

For more event information visit: aspconline.org

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information more about essential vitamins and supplements visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

Comments { 0 }

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines: Defining a Healthful Diet

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines have been released, and some supposedly significant changes, advised. Cholesterol intake is no longer limited. Saturated fat is to represent < 10% of daily caloric intake. Sustainability considerations are now to be considered. Simple sugars are anathema and caffeine is okay. Vegetables and fruits remain highly emphasized. Has much changed? Not really. Most of us in Cardiology and Lipidology dropped the cholesterol ban a decade ago. We typically emphasize fresh fruits and vegetables, low fat meat that is organic and devoid of antibiotics, and a limitation of simple sugar. Most of us don’t consider sustainability issues when advising our individual patients. Many of us believe that world issues – including economics – should stay out of the exam room and remain in the courtroom. (I am a member of that camp). But what is the layperson to do with these Guidelines? Does he or she have to make dramatic changes in his or her diet? The answer of course depends upon the individual patient’s status. Is weight loss necessary; does the patient have cardiovascular disease or very high LDL cholesterol, for instance? Let’s first look at the history of man, briefly examine the state of dietary literature, and then make some generalizations.

Anthropology unequivocally demonstrates that human beings are omnivores. In fact, all of our primate relatives also rely upon meat in the wild. They even need it in captivity. When the Washington DC Zoo attempted to breed the Amazon Golden Marmoset monkey, they failed miserably. It was not until meat was added to their diet that the monkeys begin to thrive and reproduce. Since the beginning of our tour on earth we have also eaten meat. In fact, for the first 4 million years of our existence, meat was our main source of nourishment. About 10,000 years ago we introduced farming and animal husbandry. Most farming was done to feed our animals as they represented our most desirable food source. Recently we have fallen prey to our own impact on nourishment – we have started processing, and ruining, our food. Sugar has been added; nutrients have been stripped from grains; grains are squeezed (instead of eaten whole) to produce oils; and animals have been raised in pens, limiting their ability to develop lean muscle mass, and also often requiring the introduction of antibiotics. We have created a food supply that is most likely killing us.

In response to our understanding of the role cholesterol plays in heart disease – and it does play a significant one – we have introduced guidelines to try to reduce cholesterol. Saturated fat eaten to excess does raise LDL (not a good thing), but cholesterol consumption has little impact on our LDL levels. Therefore the current Guidelines did what was appropriate and removed restrictions on cholesterol consumption while maintaining limitations on saturated fat. They also appropriately implore us to eschew sugar. No one will argue against the latter recommendation (except perhaps the sugar industry). But are there studies to support such advice? Unfortunately, beyond PrediMed (which demonstrated the cardiovascular advantage of a Mediterranean diet) no high level studies have been performed. Many observational studies exist, but doing a solid dietary trial is actually immensely difficult. Thus we are left to rely upon our understanding of basic science, animal experiments, pathophysiology, and anthropology. The conclusion for most of us I believe follows Aristotle’s ancient tenet of moderation. We should consume natural foods whenever possible, avoid processed foods, eat copious quantities of vegetables, consume ample fruit, and don’t worry so much about consuming lean meat, fatty fish, and some chicken as well. We should do this in the context of seeing our physicians, discussing our own personal issues, and modifying our diets to adjust to individual needs when indicated. Eating has become a complex endeavor, yet it ought to be much more straightforward. What we need though is access to the aforementioned natural food, the type of food that has been unscathed by human hands. And therein, unfortunately, lies the rub.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information more about essential vitamins and supplements visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

Comments { 3 }