Hot Off the Press

In medical school we learned about a life threatening form of polydipsia. A subset of patients with schizophrenia consume so much water their sodium can fall to levels unable to sustain life. Twenty liters per day often leads to not just severe illness, but death. How could this be? Water is life’s elixir, and therefore more must be better; correct? Well, simply put, the answer is no. Our kidneys can only handle a water intake of less than one liter per hour. When people exceed this limit, blood becomes diluted; sodium levels fall; and cells swell. As our brain is encased in bone, it has nowhere to go when it swells. Consequently swollen brain cells can lead to permanent damage and even death. It’s not just the unfortunate schizophrenic patients who succumb to such a fate; others do as well. One woman died after drinking six liters in just three hours during a “water drinking competition.” Others have died similarly during college hazing. The point is that a rapid, excessive and unnatural intake of our most vital ingredient for life can kill us in a matter of hours. More is definitely not always better. Aristotle was correct in his dictum of moderation. So where am I going with this you might ask. Let’s consider the most recent “negative” fish oil study by Dr. Voest that was published in a most reputable journal. (For my take on other similar articles please see prior blog posts).

Based upon the fact that some cancer cells can produce long chain fatty acids, Dr. Voest hypothesized that the omega-3 fatty acids in fish could blunt the effect of chemotherapy (such a thought process itself lacks strong scientific validity). Testing his hypothesis he administered 100 microliters of fish oil to 20 gm mice. He was right; fish oil did blunt the effects of chemotherapy. And so his findings were published in the prestigious JAMA Oncology. But let’s look at his study in proper perspective. Ignore the fact that mice are not the optimal animals to study here. Also, ignore the fact that tumor cells produce many substances that have nothing to do with their “desire” to counteract chemotherapy.  Simply examine the administered dose. One hundred microliters of fish oil for a 20 gm mouse is equivalent to 400 ml of fish oil for an 80 kg (175 pound) man. Can you imagine guzzling nearly a half-liter of fish oil? The very thought is life threatening! That’s also tantamount to swallowing around 400 fish oil capsules. Who in his right mind would do that? I’d guess no one. The study therefore has no clinical relevance. The author’s conclusion that patients should avoid fish the day prior to receiving chemotherapy has no basis in science. Yet, the study is on the news; patients are concerned that fish causes cancer; doctors who don’t fully understand this area of medicine will become as alarmed as the patients; doctors’ offices will once again be flooded with unnecessary and distracting queries born of inappropriate trial conclusions; and some people who desperately need to consume fish will place themselves in harm’s way by eschewing vital nutrients. The fallout is, and will continue to be, monumental.

Why such studies are done, and why they are published in top-notch journals eludes me. I understand why the media exploits them; they are fodder for ratings. Still, I will continue to proclaim that such studies must be quelled, and the media must become more cautious. It is fine to conjecture, study, and test hypotheses no matter how outlandish they may seem. What is not acceptable however is perpetuating false conclusions as though they are hardened facts. Such a practice – which is prevalent today – leads both doctors and patients astray and pulls us from important issues, those that can truly save lives and help humanity. Let’s get back on track and re-emphasize honesty in medicine as our prime agenda. Honesty should always trump a good story.

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Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

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