Interventional Prevention – Taking Cardiovascular Disease Prevention to a New Level

In the November 27, 2013 JAMA issue, my letter, “The Pitfalls of Population-based Prevention was published with a very favorable response from Dr. Harvey Fineberg, the head of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). I was elated to see not only the letter’s publication and my introduction of the term, “Interventional Prevention” – a modern-era approach to risk reduction – but Dr. Fineberg’s forward-thinking reply as well. Interventional Prevention is after all a departure from “standard” prevention practices. We typically think of prevention in two facets, primary and secondary.

Primary prevention entails thwarting events before they have occurred while secondary prevention is the system wherein doctors utilize strategies to stop adverse events from occurring AFTER a first event has taken place. For example, hypertension and tobacco abuse are both well-established risks for heart attack and stroke. Our goal as health care practitioners is to lower blood pressure and help patients stop smoking in order to prevent heart attacks and strokes. In patients who have already had one of these events, this is termed secondary prevention; while it is primary prevention in those who have never suffered such an outcome. This describes the established approach to prevention.

Interventional Prevention is a much more proactive process. In this construct, doctors use cutting-edge predictors of risk such as biological markers in our blood and urine and imaging of different vascular beds (carotid and coronary arteries for example) to diagnose “hidden” disease or biologic perturbations and motivate patients to make significant lifestyle and medication changes in order to reduce their risk. Then we can evaluate these same markers and actually see improvements. We can do this in patients who have never had heart attacks and strokes, ostensibly decreasing their risk of ever experiencing such an adverse outcome. In Interventional Prevention, doctors identify and expose novel risks, make changes in patients’ regimens, and then facilitate improvement in what would otherwise have been “hidden” risk factors. Essentially we illuminate the invisible thereby affording patients and doctors the opportunity to heal aspects of our bodies before these perturbations cause irreparable harm. For example, with appropriate interventions we can demonstrate improvement in inflammatory blood enzymes such as LpPLA2. High levels of LpPLA2 predict both heart attacks and strokes while low levels predict the opposite. Through proper interventions we can witness the normalization of this and many other blood and urine biomarkers, clearly demonstrating on an individual basis the improvement in health and concomitant diminution of risk. This is truly patient-centric medicine. The medicine of the future has already arrived.

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