Omega-3 Fish Oils – Misleading and Erroneous Interpretations of Scientific Studies Can Cause Harm

Recent statistics demonstrate a small but pervasive decline in national sales of fish oil supplements. Before I continue, let me make it clear that I have a bias here. In 2007 I formulated VitalOils1000, the first omega-3 fish oil carefully and uncompromisingly concentrated and purified so as to enable the American Heart Association’s recommended 1,000 mg of combined EPA and DHA to be placed in a single enteric coated soft gel.

Now, seven years later, VitalOils1000 still stands alone among a sea of fish oil choices (sorry; I couldn’t resist). Needless to say, I am very proud of that accomplishment. So my conflict is clear; I want people to take VitalOils1000. I believe it’s good for them. In fact – that’s why I designed it. So I am disturbed by the decline in people’s consumption of fish oils. Though the “business” ramification of this decline bothers me, I am far more disturbed by its root cause. Falsely frightened people have crumbled under the illusory conclusions of a few poorly constructed trials and the even-more-poorly constructed conclusions derived by “critics” of these trials.

Consider first the fact that four decades of research spanning bedside to bench and back again have demonstrated the sweeping benefits of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA – fish oil’s “active ingredients”. That’s forty years of thousands of brilliant minds examining the omega-3 issue from a multitude of vantage points. Forty years of overwhelmingly positive conclusions! Then come a few – and I mean a few – poorly designed studies with at times truly ridiculous conclusions. As with most other aspects of news reporting, the negative draws more readers and listeners than the positive. And so the media ran with the story. Some doctors even jumped on the bandwagon. “Fish oil is not what we thought it was,” they concluded. In response, omega-3 experts from around the world voiced their discontent. But their voices were muted as they failed to resonate with fear. The scientists and doctors spoke with authority and knowledge, devoid of histrionics. And so their side of the story didn’t sell newspapers or airtime. The outcome we now witness is that some people prematurely “drank the media cool aide”. They stopped their fish oils.

The problem is that I and many others in this field are left with the great concern that these individuals have left themselves less well protected against a host of disorders than they had been while taking fish oils. Unless they’ve dramatically increased their fatty fish consumption, they have certainly placed themselves in a relative omega-3 deficient state. Think of this: the average American consumes about 100 mg of combined EPA and DHA daily while the average Japanese consumes eight times this amount. And the Japanese have far lower rates of heart disease and prostate cancer than do Americans. Yet, the scant research behind the omega-3 fear mongering cited concerns about the ineffectiveness of omega-3s in cardiovascular disease as well as the possibility of omega-3s predisposing to prostate cancer.

There are many other plausible explanations for these inconclusive trials (see my blog www.fpim.org). Throwing the fish out with the fish water is however not called for. And so my conclusion here is once again to read the primary research. Do you own homework – though it may be hard – and decide for yourself what you think is best. If you need help evaluating the literature, look for the opinions of those who are true leaders in this field – William Harris, PhD, Bruce Holub, PhD, Tom Brenna, PhD, Susan Carlson, PhD (not the owner of the supplement company), and Kevin Maki, PhD for starters. There are plenty of others but be sure to listen to the experts.

Sadly we can no longer rely upon the media’s “Medical Experts” to be our source of scientific veracity. They are too busy, and often forced to weigh in on disciplines far removed from their particular areas of expertise. They cannot possibly be expected to know everything about every medical field. I am sorry to leave you with the task of “doing your own homework”, but nowadays it is something we must all become accustomed to do.

For more information about the supplements and vitamins critical to your everyday health visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

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