The Fiscal Cliff: Lessons Gleaned from Preventive Cardiology

Cardiovascular prevention requires a team effort with the doctor at the helm but the patient a necessary, eager, and deeply involved participant. The goal of prevention is to identify risks and then diminish them before a crisis ensues. Success demands identification of potential problems followed by a collaborative effort between doctor and patient to minimize those risks. Only through both proper identification and risk reduction can heart attacks and strokes be prevented. As I reflect on what I do for a living I am struck by the similarity we are all experiencing as we walk steadily toward the fiscal cliff. And I find myself perplexed by the fact that although our elected leaders have identified the problems they have been unable to work collaboratively to correct the issues. An analogous scenario would be this. I, the physician, identify a severe cholesterol problem in a patient. I then perform a coronary CT angiogram and demonstrate multiple plaques within the patient’s arteries feeding her heart. I recommend a medication to lower her risk and show her all the copious data supporting my recommendation. She turns to me and replies, “No thank you; I think I’ll just take my chances.” I of course counter with a litany of references to literature and clinical experience. Although I understand this is the best option for her, I fail to offer “lesser” alternatives. I am intransigent. She too is adamant; refuses therapy; and six months later sustains a fatal heart attack. The heart attack could have been avoided, but to do so required the joint efforts of doctor and patient. I should have been more open to “alternative” – albeit probably less successful – possibilities, and she should have been more willing to consider my well-considered recommendation.

Now we find ourselves in an economic and political game of “chicken”. Who will flinch first? Unfortunately the stakes are unbearably high. All our futures hang in the balance. Our president, recently elected by a narrow margin in the most contentious presidential battle many of us have ever witnessed blames the Republican Congress for the standoff. The Republicans blame the President. It appears their current mode of “working together and reaching across the aisle” is at best a pipedream and at worst an impossibility. Surely the Republicans must bend. But so too should the president. He represents the entire country, even the nearly 50% who did not vote for him. He was appalled by Romney’s 47% comment yet he seems to be enacting the very principle he condemned.  And, he is our leader. The buck does stop with him. He must find the way to compromise. And if he does ultimately reach across the aisle the Republicans in turn must be willing to compromise as well. If not, we will like lemmings drop over the fiscal cliff. And we all know how that ends for the lemmings. Let’s hope Congress and our President find the way to diminish the risk that they’ve so clearly identified. Let’s hope we do not experience the unnecessary, potentially fatal, but certainly avoidable “heart attack”.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

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