The American Society for Preventive Cardiology 30 Years and Counting

ASPC CVD PREVENTION

July 30, 2015 marks the start of the ASPC’s Annual meeting, taking place once again at the spectacular Boca Raton Resort. This year, in addition to our world-class faculty, new elements will be added to the meeting – poster presentations to be published in Clinical Cardiology as well as a Level 1 Expert’s Course in Preventive Cardiology. Over the next three months I will certainly write more about the conference and I hope many of you will avail yourselves of its offerings. (For more complete information please visit www.aspconline.org).

Today however, on the heels of the Dallas Cardio-Metabolic Health Congress (CMHC) I am compelled to write this brief note about the ASPC. The reason is simple. As I sat in the speaker’s row with my friends and colleagues Drs. Jamie Underberg, Amit Khera, and Michael Miller it became clear that the thirty-year-old organization is now firmly entrenched in mainstream education. You see, Dr. Underberg sits on the ASPC’s Board of Directors while Dr. Khera is the Secretary; I am the President Elect, and Dr. Miller is a Past President. It was truly heartwarming to have us all gathered together for the sole purpose of helping to educate our colleagues about issues such as Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH), Hypertriglyceridemia, Lipid and Cholesterol Guidelines, and the future of HDL research and therapies.  The ASPC is growing at a gratifyingly rapid rate, as more and more physicians, ARNPs, and other healthcare practitioners embrace the doctrine that cardiovascular disease prevention must preempt intervention in order for our nation and the world at large to be able to truly enjoy optimal health. If you are not already a member of the ASPC, please consider becoming one. Also, I encourage everyone interested in prevention to join us in July. I promise you will not be disappointed.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information about the supplements and vitamins critical to your everyday health visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

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Save the Date: It’s the American Society for Preventive Cardiology’s 40th Anniversary – The July 2015 Conference is Shaping up to be Extraordinary

That’s a long title for this week’s blog, but it’s tough to shorten. Planning a conference is quite a challenge: The venue is chosen; topics are selected; speakers are invited; and the word is disseminated. Many people’s hands are in the mix – in the case of the ASPC, our management company as well as members of the planning and executive committees work tirelessly to create a conference that will meet and exceed its intent. This year’s ASPC meetings, again at the beautiful Boca Raton Resort, will bring together attendees from across the country (and likely outside the US as well) in order to learn from some of our nation’s most renowned experts in genetics, vascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, women’s heart health, inflammation, thrombosis, CVD risk reduction strategies, familial hypercholesterolemia, lipids and lipoproteins, novel medications…

Our goal is to highlight the most cutting edge as well as tried and true approaches for ASCVD prevention so clinicians eager to improve their strategies to combat and prevent the toll of vascular disease among their patients can more effectively do so. Conference attendees are among the most dedicated of our country’s healthcare practitioners – cardiologists, internists, obstetricians, family practitioners, nurse practitioners, physicians’ assistants, pharmacists, dietitians, and many others. The Boca Raton Regional Hospital supports the program and offers its physicians the opportunity to attend this one-of-a-kind meeting. Groups such as WomenHeart, and chapters of the ACC and AHA (and others) typically endorse the meetings as well. This year, in honor of the ASPC’s 40th Anniversary, the meetings will offer its attendees two new opportunities. First, abstracts from trainees across the globe will be evaluated for presentation. Second, we will offer the inaugural Expert’s Course in ASCVD Prevention. Diplomas will be awarded to those who successfully complete the course. So who are our speakers – professors and experts in their disciplines from Harvard, Hopkins, Emory, The Mayo, Columbia, UCSD, Tulane, Minnesota, NYU, and other outstanding institutions. And when is the meeting – July 31 through August 2nd. Put it on your calendar – you and your patients will be very happy you did. See you in July!

For more event information visit: aspconline.org

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information more about essential vitamins and supplements visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

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An Update From the 2014 American Society for Preventive Cardiology (ASPC) Annual Meetings

Two weeks ago was the ASPC’s Annual meeting in Boca Raton, FL. The event was superb. Internationally recognized experts in a variety of disciplines convened in Boca Raton for the three–day-event. Nearly 200 healthcare practitioners from around the country came to listen to Professors from Northwestern, Harvard, NYU, The Mayo, Columbia University, The Miami Miller School of Medicine, Emory, Ohio State, UCLA…  Topics such as the somewhat controversial 2013 ACC/AHA Cholesterol and Obesity Guidelines, the enormously under-recognized disorder Familial Hypercholesterolemia, and the vast sex differences in CVD presentation and treatment were discussed.

My lecture was entitled, “The Omega-3 Fatty Acids DHA and EPA: Caution when interpreting the Trials. It’s time to get back to the basics.”  The talk highlighted enormous limitations inherent in recent omega-3 studies. It is not only clinicians and laypeople who must understand such issues, but the press as well. Too many reporters – and even physicians in the news – misinterpret clinical studies, oftentimes sending not just misleading messages to the pubic, but potentially damaging ones as well.

DHA and EPA are the essential fatty acids found in fish, NOT flax, Chia, or olive/canola oil. These fatty acids have been studied in a variety of disorders ranging from heart attacks to dementias, ADHD, eye disease, inflammatory bowel disorders, and Rheumatologic ailments. The list is actually even more extensive than this. Their benefits are legion – anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-arrhythmic, and anti-thrombotic to name a few. Scientists across the globe are spending their entire careers evaluating the myriad biological effects of these fatty acids. Although we still do not know precisely how DHA and EPA will fit into our medicinal armamentarium, we do know that they have an important role to play. More studies and clinical trials are needed. One thing is clear however. DHA and EPA are here to stay. They represent a component in our diets that should be emphasized, not neglected. Nearly daily fatty fish or fish oils should be a part of most people’s dietary habits.

Beyond the value of DHA and EPA is an even more important message though. The media, in their unbridled attempt to produce quick and enticing stories, often critically misses the mark. Consequently we all must be very careful about how we interpret what we read or hear. We must always be vigilant when drawing conclusions about our health as well as other consequential matters.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information more about essential vitamins and supplements visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

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New AHA / ACC Cholesterol Guidelines – Controversial but not to be Feared

Last week four guidelines were released by the AHA and ACC. A tremendous amount of controversy surrounded the Cholesterol Guidelines as they deviated in fundamental ways from prior standards. The writers of the guidelines took a strict Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) slant, limiting extrapolation and thereby altering the traditional approach to cholesterol management. For example the format of all prior clinical trials did not specifically address cholesterol goals. Thus they were excluded from the guidelines. That does not, however, mean that it is wrong to continue to try to “get our patients to goal”. It simply means that in the strictest view of EBM, there is insufficient evidence to do so. The American Society for Preventive Cardiology (ASPC, of which I am Treasurer) and several other organizations endorsed the document. The National Lipid Association (NLA) did not. It is critical for practitioners to understand two things when trying to utilize this document as effectively as possible. First, the guideline was meant to be a living work, one that will be updated at regular intervals. Second, and perhaps far more consequential, it is essential that practitioners ardently adhere to a single paragraph from the guidelines which follows:

“Guidelines attempt to define practices that meet the needs of patients in most circumstances and are not a replacement for clinical judgment. The ultimate decision about care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and patient in light of the circumstances presented by that patient. As a result, situations might arise in which deviations from these guidelines may be appropriate.”

In sum, we most always remember that guidelines are just tools to help practitioners understand the most recent evidence in medicine. They are not laws. Clinical judgment must always reign supreme.

Please read more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

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USDA Names 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee

farmer's marketThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack have announced the appointment of 15 nationally recognized experts to serve on the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The Committee’s recommendations and rationale will serve as a basis for the eighth edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Every five years, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans are updated and published jointly by HHS and USDA. The administrative responsibility for leading the process alternates between Departments. The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at HHS is the administrative lead for the 2015 process.

Dr. Thomas Brenna, the President elect of ISSFAL (International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids and Lipids) is among the 15 renowned experts appointed to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

Of special note: Dr. Brenna has been invited to speak at the American Society of Preventive Cardiology’s Second Annual Southeastern Conference “CDV Prevention for Women” event, which is being held in collaboration with Boca Raton Hospital in Boca Raton, FL July 12 – 13th. I’ll be chairing the event which will be held at the Boca Raton Resort & Club.  I’m also proud to serve as the treasury of ISSFAL.

Please read more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

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September 20th is FH Awareness Day!

September 20th is FH Awareness Day. So you ask yourself; what does this mean to you and your loved ones? FH, or Familial Hypercholesterolemia, is a genetic cholesterol disorder that leads to premature vascular disease. In the most severe circumstances, very young children can experience life-threatening heart attacks and strokes. Typically however, the disease does not wreak havoc until people reach their 40s and 50s. FH is not as rare as you might imagine. It occurs in one out of every 500 people, but in some populations – like French Canadians and South African Ashkenazi Jews – the number can be as high as one in 67! To make matters worse, the disorder often goes undetected.

In an attempt to thwart the dire consequences of FH, organizations like the FH Foundation, the National Lipid Association and the American Society for Preventive Cardiology are working hard to raise awareness. September 20th was therefore established as National FH Awareness Day by the FH Foundation. These organizations – and I personally – encourage you to speak to your doctor to see whether you harbor this silent threat. If you do, don’t be afraid; treatment is available for you and your family. Remember, as a genetic disease FH can impact all members of your immediate and even extended family. Consequently all relatives of a single FH patient should be screened with simple cholesterol tests. Please don’t procrastinate. See your doctor soon to be sure you do not have FH.

For more information on FH treatment alternatives, including LDL-Apheresis, visit Preventive Cardiology Inc.

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Upcoming Cardiovascular Disease Prevention for Women Event in Boca Raton

Cardiovascular Disease Prevention for Women

I’m going to be co-chairing the first annual American Society of Preventive Cardiology’s Southeastern Conference Cardiovascular Prevention for Women event on Saturday April 28th. My co-chair will be Stephen L. Kopecky, MD, Professor of Medicine at the College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota. The event is co-sponsored by Boca Raton Regional Hospital and supported by many organizations such as the National Lipid Association, Go Red for Women, WomenHeart, The American Heart Association, and others..

If you are a health care practitioner interested in learning the latest about Women’s health, join us for this one-day conference at the Renaissance Boca Raton Hotel. (Continuing education credits are available.) The meeting will be led by a renowned group of faculty. Sessions will focus on the integrated delivery of preventive care for women, emphasizing early and aggressive global cardiovascular risk reduction strategies. You will leave with eye-opening practical solutions for managing your female patients. We look forward to seeing you soon.

For more information on the event and registration go to aspconline.org.

Visit vitalremedymd.com for more preventive healthcare solutions.

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