Diet Tip: Please Read the Label

A good deal of my time with patients is spent teaching. I teach about theories regarding plaque formation, consequences of a ruptured plaque – heart attack being the most feared – and the spectrum of cardiac risk factors. In discussing risk factors I then delve deeper. I discuss LDL particles and why counting them is so important. I discuss the role of inflammation in heart disease. We talk about eating a balanced and healthful diet, and of course we always discuss achieving and maintaining an optimal weight.

For the last few years I have been working with a gentleman in his forties who suffers from premature coronary artery disease. He’s already had one stent and our mission is to prevent a second event. And so we have systematically and effectively mitigated each of his risk factors. Except for his weight. As hard as we’ve tried, we have failed. His stubborn 15 to 20 pounds of excess overweight has been a thorn in both of our sides.  He really has tried quite hard. He’s trimmed portions, eliminated all simple carbohydrates, stopped drinking excess alcohol, and religiously exercised an hour a day. Yet, no weight loss… Until his last visit.

The other week my young patient entered the room with draping pants and a flouncy shirt. His clothes were not those of an older, larger brother. They were his. Somehow he had done it. He had lost 19 pounds. And his smile betrayed his brimming desire to let me know his secret.  So here it is. He started reading labels. Though we had previously discussed the importance of label reading, I apparently had failed to adequately emphasize the point. Now here he stood, proving the power of the label. What he had discovered is quite fascinating. My patient, a lover of coffee, had been consuming over 3,600 calories each week in the form of coffee creamers. Although the creamer labels revealed a mere 20 calories per serving, he had failed to recognize just how many servings he used per cup of coffee. It wasn’t until he had counted the bottles of creamer he used on a weekly basis, along with the total number of calories per bottle, did he recognize just how caloric and fattening was his coffee creamer habit. He responded to his newfound knowledge with discipline and resolve, and in three short months without doing anything other than eliminating excess coffee creamer he achieved his desired weight.

The lesson here is simple: Know exactly what you’re consuming. Be careful about portions. And don’t be misled. Do the math if you’re having trouble losing weight. Count the calories you consume and eliminate those you don’t need. This basic approach worked magic for my patient; I’m confident it can do the same for you.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information more about essential vitamins and supplements visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

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Time for a Food Police Force?

Incessantly the media, scientists, doctors, self-proclaimed experts of this or that pronounce they have found the answer to some burning issue. Mostly the matters involve health. What fat is best, or are carbohydrates better than saturated fats, or is fish oil really any good, or is the rampant use of statins the product of evil pharmaceutical propaganda. The list is interminable. And everyone has a voice. Actors and actresses somehow as a consequence of their on-screen fame have absorbed knowledge beyond that which is possessed by even our greatest scientists. Newscasters weigh in and authors sell their latest tomes with promises of truth. The whole dance of the experts would be quite amusing were it not so dangerous.

What seems to be missing from all those who have managed to communicate so easily with the almighty is a sense of responsibility. When people voice their opinions with such certitude, and their audience believes in their veracity with such solidarity, what is truly opinion then masquerades as fact. As a consequence, fiery battles flare among opposing sides. The vegans pound their fists shouting, “Not even a drop of oil! No fat at all!” The Wheat Belly folk eschew the grains, while the dairy exorcists discard the milk, and the Atkins aficionados chow down on meat and more meat. Get them together on TV and you have a firestorm.

Now bring in the politicians and celebrities. They take whatever “science” they find most convincing and try to turn it into law. No large sodas for the sugar busters; no trans fats for practically everyone (that one I have to admit is compelling), nothing with a face for the vegans. In short order there won’t be much left to eat at all.

I have my own take on the diet issue. In short I’m fairly certain we are all quite different, and consequently do better with different diets. As a generalization though I’d recommend moderation in all things, avoiding processed foods, eating a balanced diet, maintaining an optimal weight, and exercising daily. Perhaps that prescription would make a good law.

Fundamentally it comes down to this. We should all be permitted to eat whatever we wish as long as it doesn’t harm anyone but us. Government should not have the right to tell an individual what he or she can or cannot consume. There is a key caveat though. This holds true, “as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone else.” So what do we do about the ailments that occur as a consequence of food-induced obesity – diabetes for one? Do we penalize the consumers of sugar who as a consequence of their dietary predilections become obese and diabetic? Do they pay higher health insurance premiums? Probably not a popular notion. How about the smokers, should everyone foot the bill for his or her heart disease, COPD, and lung cancer treatments? Clearly these issues are slippery slopes, ones upon which I have no desire to tread.

I will emphasize one point however, and of this I am sure. No one knows what diet is best for all mankind. And until such a discovery is made, creating a food police force is probably not a good idea at all.

Learn more about preventive cardiology at www.preventivecardiologyinc.com.

For more information more about essential vitamins and supplements visit www.vitalremedymd.com.

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Preventive Health News

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This week’s roundup of important preventive health and health-related news.

 Visit vitalremedymd.com for preventive health solutions.

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Heart Month is Over but Good Habits Should Remain

woman on beachFebruary, National Heart Month, has come and gone. Hopefully you were inspired to embrace therapeutic lifestyle changes, a healthful diet and exercise regimen. If not, please do not fret. It is not too late to bring health into your life. If you did make the necessary adjustments, congratulations! You are well on the road to better health, increased happiness, and a diminished chance of experiencing the nearly inevitable for other westerners, a heart attack or stroke. The challenge now is to maintain your new-found behaviors. It is often difficult to convert lifestyle changes into permanent practices. The reality is, however, that if you do not embed these healthful modifications into your very being, you will fail to reap their rewards. So, I am writing to you this first week of March to implore you to continue in your quest for optimal health. Continue to exercise, eat well, and strive to achieve and maintain your appropriate weight. As a word of encouragement I can assure you that when you maintain your improved life behaviors for just three consecutive months you dramatically increase the chance that these changes will be yours forever. In sum, keep going. Do not despair if it’s a struggle for you now. Just keep pushing and believing that your efforts will pay off. After three months you will look back and smile, observing that you did it. You will have forever changed your life for the better. And believe it or not you will actually enjoy your daily exercise and even your better diet. So in the words of the great Nike marketers, “Just Do It”. You and your loved ones will forever appreciate this commitment to health.

Visit vitalremedymd.com for more preventive healthcare solutions.

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